Gabrielle Chanel

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As one of the most successful fashion houses in existence, Chanel owes much to the templates first laid down by its founder – Gabrielle ‘Coco’ Chanel (1883-1971). Some of her most celebrated designs, such as the two-piece suit, the little black dress and the quilted handbag, remain in vogue to this day. Chanel designed first and foremost for herself- by creating clothes fit for an independent and active lifestyle, she anticipated the needs and wants of the modern woman.

This beautiful book showcases a stunning array of Chanel’s most notable designs from her 60 years in fashion, largely drawn from the collections of the Chanel Patrimoine, Paris and the V&A. It examines the cut, construction, embellishment and provenance of the ensembles, as well as the design themes and motifs Chanel returned to throughout her career. Newly commissioned photographs of the selected pieces, together with archival images, capture the design evolution of this fashion icon.

Nostalgique

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Take a nostalgique journey and discover 50 beautiful photographs of once-everyday objects and their stories in this delightful coffee table book. Explore things from the 1800s to the 1960s, from the elegant to the unusual, items used by storytellers, singers, shopkeepers, and spies!

This unique combination of photography and history is beautifully presented and is a light, but engaging read. It is also the perfect companion to collectors of the limited-edition print series.

The book itself is attractively bound with heavy gloss pages. It will arrive in a gorgeous vintage-style paper wrap crafted especially for it, showing old advertisements of items from the book.

Cast Mates

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Australia has a long cinema history — starting with the world’s first feature film, The Story of the Kelly Gang, made in Melbourne and released in 1906. Today, much of Australia’s film talent goes to the United States, looking for bigger and more lucrative opportunities. But what does this mean for the history and future of Australian cinema?

The larger-than-life personalities that form the heart of this book — Errol Flynn, Peter Finch, David Gulpilil and Nicole Kidman — have dominated cinema screens both locally and internationally and starred in some of the biggest films of their eras — including The Adventures of Robin Hood, Network, Crocodile Dundee and Eyes Wide Shut among others.

From the Golden Age of Hollywood in the 1930s to the streaming wars of today, the lives of these four actors, and their many cast mates, tell a story of how a nation’s cinema was founded, then faltered, before finding itself again.

1964: Eyes of the Storm

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Photographs and Reflections by Paul McCartney

In 2020, an extraordinary trove of nearly a thousand photographs taken by Paul McCartney on a 35mm camera was re-discovered in his archive. They intimately record the months towards the end of 1963 and beginning of 1964 when Beatlemania erupted in the UK and, after the band’s first visit to the USA, they became the most famous people on the planet. The photographs are McCartney’s personal record of this explosive time, when he was, as he puts it, in the ‘Eyes of the Storm’.

1964- Eyes of the Storm presents 275 of McCartney’s photographs from the six cities of these intense, legendary months – Liverpool, London, Paris, New York, Washington, D.C. and Miami – and many never-before-seen portraits of John, George and Ringo. In his Foreword and Introductions to these city portfolios, McCartney remembers ‘what else can you call it – pandemonium‘ and conveys his impressions of Britain and America in 1964 – the moment when the culture changed and the Sixties really began.

Why We Sing

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Singing makes you feel good. Everyone who sings in a community choir or just in the shower knows this, and relishes the sense of liberation, connection and sheer joy that singing can bring.

In this inspiring and thought-provoking memoir, singer and community music teacher Julia Hollander celebrates our impulse to sing, from the beginning to the end of life. Drawing on her personal experience as well as the fascinating recent findings of neurological research, she shows how we are hardwired to sing. She explores how our bodies create song, and how singing helps children acquire language. She shows how singing is an integral part of faith, and how it is embedded in political activism. She shares with us her experience of running singing groups with people with dementia and disability, and how learning singing can open up a new world for teenagers.

More than ever, singing has become important to people of all backgrounds as a way of dealing with the sense of hopelessness and loneliness in our busy, digitally focused lives. Julia describes her book as a singing memoir, and Why We Sing is for anyone who loves to sing.

‘This book (and singing) is so great for the mind and soul!’ –Jonathon Welch AM DUniv, Founding Artistic Director of Choir of Hard Knocks

‘A passionate, personal and impeccably researched love letter to singing’ –Astrid Jorgensen, Pub Choir

‘A wonderful read. To sing is to be happy and it feeds the soul.’ –Peter Coleman-Wright AO, Pacific Opera