Plat

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Vivid and haunting elegy facing Mormonism, suicide, and gender in the American West.

In Plat, Lindsey Webb surveys the dream space of grief. By delimiting the reader’s view to the geographical, philosophical—even ecological—dimensions of her own personal loss, Webb pushes sentiment out of the grid. Much like Lucretia Martel’s film, The Headless Woman, Plat interrogates capitalism, collective cultural life and religion through the unrealized dreams of Prophets, the unspoken words of the dead, and the violent bang and clatter of an accident that’s always held unseen. Plat is the perfect song for our dystopian world and Lindsey Webb, the singer of our utopian dreams.

–GEOFF RICKLY

Every time I open Lindsey Webb’s Plat it reveals itself to be something uncannily different, so much so that I am beginning to understand it as being exactly that: an environment composed of the many facets of its personality constantly shifting, i.e. a book-length spinning jenny, the translation of the self-consciousness of moving through a succession of interiors in the absence of the one who is waiting, elegy and augury, just for starters. And because it is poetry, I understand it also as the realization that grief is dimensional (architectural, horticultural), the design and cultivation of the afterlife.

–BRANDON SHIMODA

“At once phenomenological and grounded, vast and detailed, Lindsey Webb’s Plat renews my faith in language. Its contours remind me of Rosmarie Waldrop’s Curves to the Apple, but Plat finds a grammar all its own. An exquisite debut collection.”

–CLAIRE DONATO

“The three poems of Plat—‘Garden,’ ‘Mancala,’ and ‘House’—constitute a tripartite movement through mourning as though to move beyond it, but equally in terror and in thrall one remains snagged on the thorny subjunctives of these premises. Snagged on the as-though. ‘I crawl,’ Webb writes, ‘in the interest of the dead.’ This calamitous book treats grief even as it assays the estate of the Real. The poet’s instruments: a burnished language of the uncanny, ‘a veiled approach toward a sentence,’ and a ‘collaps[ing] inward toward the future, away from all frontiers.’ I am deeply affected by Lindsey Webb’s necropastoral.”

–ADITI MACHADO

“Lindsey Webb’s Plat explores brutal loss through the lens of a failed utopia, with each poem crafted like a careful prayer. ‘I’ve not opened your letters. I’ve not kept your laugh fresh,’ the speaker admits, leading us out of an ethereal garden and into a house where death is reluctantly accepted. In Plat, heaven is an ever-changing, manmade structure where pain and suffering persist, with hope nothing more than a whisper. Webb creates lines with careful brush strokes, each more devastating than the last.”

–LAUREN MILICI

“In Webb’s brilliant book, Plat, a story unfolds in plants and in futures that do not exist. The poems ask, is there room for death in the utopia? Is there room for any of us in the plat, in the house, or in the garden? Reading this stunning collection reinforces that loss is both collective and connecting. Together we are in the house and together we are hurting. Windows, walls, all feeling.”

–LA WARMAN

Lindsey Webb’s Plat is a haunted, Western elegy which grapples with the suicide of her childhood friend in the context of their Mormon upbringing. In conversation with Joseph Smith’s prophesied but unrealized heavenly city, the Plat of Zion, Webb explores a vexed, disorienting space. Her prose poems lead the reader through an unearthly garden and into a house which eludes laws of time or space, unearthing the porous border between the living and the dead.

Plat hearkens to Leonora Carrington, Lyn Hejinian, and Willa Cather, with ecstatic and painterly language that broods over gender, death, and memory like a thundercloud. As ecological and built structures feverishly crumble, Webb maps the grief of a yet-unachieved utopias in the wake of personal loss. She considers how dreams for our imagined worlds and selves may survive.

Lindsey Webb is the author of the chapbooks House and Perfumer’s Organ. Her writings have appeared in Chicago Review, Denver Quarterly, jubilat, and Lana Turner, among others. She lives in Salt Lake City, where she is a Clarence Snow Memorial Fellow and PhD candidate in Literature and Creative Writing at the University of Utah. She edits Thirdhand Books. Plat is her first book.

Gay Heaven Is A Dance Floor but I Can’t Relax

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The breakout poetry collection in a multiform, poetic conversation between queer and trans artists and writers.

Like meeting under a disco ball, or listening to Arthur Russell on the Staten Island Ferry, Gay Heaven Is a Dance Floor but I Can’t Relax proposes reading as a form of friendship. Conversational, inquisitive, and scrutinizing, this book goes out to anyone who has loved someone they’ll never get to meet.

Gay Heaven Is a Dance Floor but I Can’t Relax gives me the same kind of excitement and imaginative heat that obsessing over the glossy photo middles of queer biographies does. These poems collectively form a watery slide between past and present, care and anxiety, form and formlessness, verb and noun. We can live large in the slippage between the relational and the overwhelmingly mysterious. It would be so easy to fall into a nostalgic hole, but charles isn’t that kind of poet. Rather, we dance (or write) into the polymorphous dawn, “the extended cut, a technology for sensing forever.” I’m grateful to have these poems for how they welcome us in through surreal syntax that then somehow forms a new grammar where metabolic harmony with cats and capybaras, zinnias and rambutans, is the norm, is the gay heaven.”

– Stacy Szymaszek

“The poems in Gay Heaven Is a Dance Floor but I Can’t Relax possess astonishing depths of love in their arrangements of words and sounds, in their amusement with and within exuberant complexities, and in their utter resistance to giving in to harm and harm’s byways. The long title poem, on and for and with Arthur Russell, is a cascade of forms and voices channeled through dance and the untouch into the continuousness of collective knowledge, movement and grief in the face of devastation. And then like Martin Wong, among many other sources of art and hope, charles theonia digs the way firemen smell, listens for sounds waiting for an open mouth, and knows ‘Begin can be replaced with any word that brings you closer.’ This book is a companion for life.”

– Anselm Berrigan

“Lucky for us we dream in landscapes / beyond our experience,” writes charles theonia in the long poem opening their electric debut collection, and readers are all the luckier for it. Brimming with a sense of the possible, among its many offerings are ‘other arrangements of the self;’ the dance of bodies (textual and not) entangled in sound; portals to multiple elsewheres—’Utopia: a compulsion to keep remaking this world.’ This world can’t become on its own, hence its gregarious erotics. Jump in!”

– Mónica de la Torre

“charles theonia’s poems are everything!”

– Tourmaline

“Nothing is not gay, and neither space nor time can prevent people from touching in charles theonia’s new collection of poems, Gay Heaven Is a Dance Floor But I Can’t Relax, in which language is motioned to meet desire, to rouse it, spark it, make it public and then make it echo—because why shouldn’t it? theonia’s poems are for creatures of feeling who want both/and. They arouse, resound and satisfy.”

– Shiv Kotecha

charles theonia is a Brooklyn poet, enthusiast, and transsexual without direction. They are the author of chaplet If a Piece Falls off the Poem, Keep It and other writings on zits, piss, and disco.

Selected Poems

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Published for the centenary of his birth, a gathering of lucid, intensely lyrical poetry from one of the twentieth century’s pre-eminent literary voices

be courageous when reason fails you be courageous
in the final reckoning it is the only thing that counts

Zbigniew Herbert was one of the best-known and most-translated poets of post-war Poland, opposed alike to Communism, Fascism, nationalism and the Church, yet moved, throughout his work, by ‘a powerful sense of right and wrong without a corresponding belief in a system’ (New York Times).

His is a poetry of compression, lucidity and profound humanity. The universe he conjures is deeply informed not only by his own time, but by history – by that of the Medieval Mediterranean and Central Europe, as much as of the Classical world – and by a taste for historical and philosophical paradox. In the early and middle works, the figure of the trickster never seems far from view. Throughout, Herbert asks questions about the nature and needs of sentient beings. His desire, always, is to ‘touch the essence’- to get to the heart of life.

Selected with an introduction and afterword by J. M. Coetzee, this outstanding gathering from the full range of Herbert’s poetic output invites readers to experience the beauty and profundity of a remarkable body of work.

Zbigniew Herbert was born in Lw w, Poland, in 1924, and studied law, economics and philosophy at the universities of Krakow, Torun, and Warsaw. His books include Report from the Besieged City and Other Poems, Mr Cogito, Still Life with a Bridle and The King of the Ants. He died in 1998.

Latino Poetry: The Library of America Anthology (LOA #382)

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For nearly five centuries, the rich tapestry of Latino poetry has been woven from a wealth of languages and cultures-a “tremendous continental mixturao,” in the words of the poet Tato Laviera.

Now, in an unprecedented anthology edited by the poet and critic Rigoberto Gonzalez, Library of America brings together more than 180 poets whose poems bear witness to the beauty and power of this vital and expanding tradition- its profound engagement with pasts both mythical and historical, its reckoning with the complexities of language, land, and identity, and its vision of a nation enriched by the stories of immigrants, exiles, refugees, and their descendants.

There are a brilliant array of contemporary voices here as well, spinning out the tapestry of Latino poetry in daring new directions. Taking the measure of this current renaissance, the anthology culminates with the most comprehensive survey of twenty-first century Latino poetry yet published.

Featured poets include-

  • Jose Marti
  • Julia de Burgos
  • Sandra Cisneros
  • Pedro Pietri
  • Juan Felipe Herrera
  • Jaime Manrique
  • Javier Zamora
  • Aracelis Girmay
  • Natalie Diaz, and
  • U.S. Poet Laureate Ada Lim n.

This groundbreaking collection captures as never before the richness, diversity, and power of the Latino poetic imagination.

This landmark Latinx poetry collection offers “a wondrous journey through the passions, the ideas, and the diversity of a people redefining what it means to be American” (Hector Tobar, Pulitzer Prize winner)

Includes more than 180 poets, spanning from the 17th century to today, and presents those poems written in Spanish in the original and in English translation

For nearly five centuries, the rich tapestry of Latino poetry has been woven from a wealth of languages and cultures-a “tremendous continental mixturao,” in the words of the poet Tato Laviera.

Now, in an unprecedented anthology edited by the poet and critic Rigoberto Gonzalez, Library of America brings together more than 180 poets whose poems bear witness to the beauty and power of this vital and expanding tradition- its profound engagement with pasts both mythical and historical, its reckoning with the complexities of language, land, and identity, and its vision of a nation enriched by the stories of immigrants, exiles, refugees, and their descendants.

There are a brilliant array of contemporary voices here as well, spinning out the tapestry of Latino poetry in daring new directions. Taking the measure of this current renaissance, the anthology culminates with the most comprehensive survey of twenty-first century Latino poetry yet published.

Featured poets include-

  • Jose Marti
  • Julia de Burgos
  • Sandra Cisneros
  • Pedro Pietri
  • Juan Felipe Herrera
  • Jaime Manrique
  • Javier Zamora
  • Aracelis Girmay
  • Natalie Diaz, and
  • U.S. Poet Laureate Ada Lim n.

This groundbreaking collection captures as never before the richness, diversity, and power of the Latino poetic imagination.

Rigoberto Gonzalez is distinguished professor of English at Rutgers University in Newark, where he is director of the MFA program in Creative Writing.

The Collected Poems

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The collected works of ‘the patron saint of poetry’, Roger McGough

For sixty years, Roger McGough has thrilled and delighted generations of readers with his irreverent, intimate and ever-original poetry. The Collected Poems presents the definitive selection of his very best work, from the Mersey-soaked sound of his quintessential Sixties start, through to tender meditations on fatherhood and family, and on to political sendups, pandemic playfulness and brilliant new writing. Here, then, is an unmatched store of warmth, wisdom and feeling from Britain’s most beloved poet.

Roger McGough was a member of the group Scaffold in the 1960s when he contributed poems to the Penguin title The Mersey Sound, which has since sold over a million copies and is now available as a Penguin Classic. He has published many books of poems for children and adults, and both his Collected Poems (2004) and Selected Poems (2006) are also available in Penguin. He presents Poetry Please on Radio 4 and is President of the Poetry Society. He was honoured with the Freedom of the City of Liverpool in 2001 and with a CBE in 2005 for services to literature.