The End of Eden: Wild Nature in the Age of Climate Breakdown

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A revelatory exploration of climate change from the perspective of wild species and natural ecosystems – an homage to the miraculous, vibrant entity that is life on Earth.

The stories we usually tell ourselves about climate change tend to focus on the damage inflicted on human societies by big storms, severe droughts, and rising sea levels. But the most powerful impacts are being and will be felt by the natural world and its myriad species, which are already in the midst of the sixth great extinction. Rising temperatures are fracturing ecosystems that took millions of years to evolve, disrupting the life forms they sustain – and in many cases driving them towards extinction. The natural Eden that humanity inherited is quickly slipping away.

Although we can never really know what a creature thinks or feels, The End of Eden invites the reader to meet wild species on their own terms in a range of ecosystems that span the globe. Combining classic natural history, firsthand reportage, and insights from cutting-edge research, Adam Welz brings us close to creatures like moose in northern Maine, parrots in Puerto Rico, cheetahs in Namibia, and rare fish in Australia as they struggle to survive. The stories are intimate yet expansive and always dramatic.

An exquisitely written and deeply researched exploration of wild species reacting to climate breakdown, The End of Eden offers a radical new kind of environmental journalism that connects humans to nature in a more empathetic way than ever before and galvanizes us to act in defense of the natural world before it’s too late.

Summer Light: A Walk Across Norway

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Andrew Stevenson demonstrates Norway’s magical appeal as he walks and cycles from Oslo to Bergen. Getting stuck in the odd snowdrift as he travels across the breadth of the country.

Endless summer days and vast wilderness: Norway is an outdoor paradise almost too good to be true. Andrew Stevenson’s affectionate luminous account reveals the magical appeal of this Scandinavian wonderland. As he walks and cycles across the country from Oslo to Bergen. Staying at clifftop farms, climbing the country’s highest mountains or taking a side trip far to the north of the Arctic circle. Andrew gets under Scandinavia’s skin as someone who has lived there and speaks the language can. He introduces a land he loves to the new love of his life. He also comes to peace with a country of light-and darkness.

Antarctica Cruising Guide

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Antarctica Cruising Guide is the only definitive field guide to Antarctica for visitors travelling by cruise ship or adventure boat. The book is also a perennial best-seller.

Now packed with even more breathtaking colour photographs, wildlife descriptions, detailed maps and scientific information. This updated fifth edition includes full accounts of interesting places, spectacular landscapes, and local plants and wildlife-from penguins and seabirds to whales and seals. World-recognised experts in Antarctic travel, wildlife and conservation are the authors of this book. They provide totally up-to-the-minute details of the threats to the white continent. Including climate change, and tips on how visitors can minimise their impact and help preserve this unique place.

The Telescope in the Ice

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The Telescope in the Ice is about the building of IceCube. Scientific American called the building the “weirdest” of the seven wonders of modern astronomy. It’s the inside story of the people who built the instrument, the mistakes they made and the blind alleys they went down. As well as the solutions they found, their conflicts, and teamwork. It’s a success story.

The IceCube is located at the US Amundsen-Scott Research Station at the geographic South Pole. The instrument doesn’t detect light, so it is different from most telescopes. It employs a cubic kilometer of diamond-clear ice, more than a mile beneath the surface, to detect an elementary particle known as the neutrino. In 2010, it detected the first extraterrestrial high-energy neutrinos and thus gave birth to a new field of astronomy.

The IceCube is the largest particle physics detector ever built. Its scientific goals span not only astrophysics and cosmology but also pure particle physics. This fertile ground as the neutrino is one of the strangest and least understood of the known elementary particles. Neutrino physics is perhaps the most active field in particle physics today, and IceCube is at this forefront.

The Telescope in the Ice is about people and the thrill of the chase. The struggle to understand the neutrino ever since it was “invented” by the extraordinary Wolfgang Pauli in 1930. As well as the early researchers who helped understand it, the strange things it taught them about the nature of space and time, and the pioneers and inventors of neutrino astronomy.

Scott and Amundsen: The Last Place on Earth

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At the beginning of the twentieth century, the South Pole was the most coveted prize in the fiercely nationalistic modern age of exploration. In the brilliant dual biography, the award-winning writer Roland Huntford re-examines every detail of the great race to the South Pole between Britain’s Robert Scott and Norway’s Roald Amundsen. Scott, who dies along with four of his men only eleven miles from his next cache of supplies, became Britain’s beloved failure. While Amundsen, who not only beat Scott to the Pole but returned alive, was largely forgotten. This account of their race is a gripping, highly readable history that captures the driving ambitions of the era. As well as the complex, often deeply flawed men who were charged with carrying them out.

 

THE LAST PLACE ON EARTH is the first of Huntford’s masterly trilogy of polar biographies. It is also the only work on the subject in the English language based on the original Norwegian sources, to which Huntford returned to revise and update this edition.